OT: Jersey City is most expensive city in America

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NotInRHouse

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I can guarantee the ethnic mix of residents on my block qualifies under diverse… both college educated… blue collar… hard working folks. What makes me always laugh is the number of posters here who are RU grads (I assume ) and still telling people where and how they should live. The towns they should be choosing for a diverse universal effect while residing in pluralistic white conclaves . Especially those who boast of having the two homes with one at the Jersey shore . Who cares if you live on a cul de sac?

No one cares who lives on a cul de sac

They're mocking people who don't leave their cul de sac

For example: a poster with 4+ handles on this board who claims that Hoboken is "covered in broken glass"
 

NotInRHouse

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When you refer to a bubble, how big does that bubble have to be- when it is a cup de sac bubble- I take it as protected small areas of towns that absolutely segregate or wish they could. It doesn’t reflect a town or state in a whole. We have a whole lot of these people on this site posting quite often on the CE board.

Exactly

One can live on a cul de sac and not be in a bubble.

For example, living in a diverse suburban town in central NJ and enjoying the various cultural events, unique food options, and expanded shopping.

Someone can live on a cul de sac in Mahwah and grab bulgogi in Fort Lee and stop at the Russian banya in Fair Lawn. They can live in Edison and go to dim sum and pick up supplies on Oak Tree Road.

Or they can live in on a suburban cul de sac a few miles from where they grow up, live at home while attending RU on a free ride courtesy of their parents' union, and never develop any meaningful relationships outside of those spent in hours a day on a message board under different handle promoting political views long rejected.

The difference is so easy to spot as you correctly point out.
 

NotInRHouse

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I get why some people don’t like cities, it’s not for everyone. I don’t get why they have to pretend all cities are terrible. If you don’t like it just don’t go there.

Because we have a minority in this country and on this board intent on forcing their fringe views on everyone. Yesterday was the start of the rejection of that. They of course won't be stopped but they're on notice. Someone is still paying to promote their nonsense and try to convince people to ignore their eyes and ears.
 

yesrutgers01

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Exactly

One can live on a cul de sac and not be in a bubble.

For example, living in a diverse suburban town in central NJ and enjoying the various cultural events, unique food options, and expanded shopping.

Someone can live on a cul de sac in Mahwah and grab bulgogi in Fort Lee and stop at the Russian banya in Fair Lawn. They can live in Edison and go to dim sum and pick up supplies on Oak Tree Road.

Or they can live in on a suburban cul de sac a few miles from where they grow up, live at home while attending RU on a free ride courtesy of their parents' union, and never develop any meaningful relationships outside of those spent in hours a day on a message board under different handle promoting political views long rejected.

The difference is so easy to spot as you correctly point out.
It is crazy- what I see when I or anyone in America talks about systematic or racism in any way- there is so much talk from people that should be helping but also have no right to argue it. My pre life, spent as a white male, suburbia, white wife and kids- I would have been in that group but also would have argued very strongly the following:
*Don't get in trouble with the law and you will have no trouble with the law
*If the police say hands up- just do it - you have nothing to fear if innocent
*I know a lot of minorities and friends with them and have no problem inviting anyone over to my house, out with my friends, etc
*Corporation no longer hire based on race but usually hire minorities over whites, not for their skills but for quota.
*My town went from 5% diversity to almost 12% - I have a black couple in my neighborhood and no one looks at them different.

And then, my household over the past 20 years has become majority black/Caribbean - and my world was rocked.

And I have 2 white boys and 2 black boys and the world is different for them.

My wife and I have the world treat us differently

Corporations- My wife is a Mortgage Loan "Advisor" in 10 states over a 29 year career. Presidents club in almost every one of them. Various companies and if they make "teams" she always finds that let's say they have 100 other in her position/title- her team will have the only other black female in that position on it. Her team will always be the most diversified, her team will never get the role of the A team.

In our towns and neighborhoods- our family used to be invited to everything in town and High School and everyone's party when our son was in the NFL.
After- we do get along with almost everyone and they will invite us over one on one and many of their parties. But we find there are parties we used to get invited to or parties where others that are not interracial but with same relationship are invited to...etc
Why, when we go to a car dealership or one of the highend flagship stores such as Nordstrum at the mall- we always happen to get the black sales person?

These are the things that those in the bubble do not see or feel and since they don't see it, it could not possibly be happening unless we have proof or numbers. I would have denied it previously myself and only now do I realize I would have done that out of defending myself not ever standing in the other person's shoes.
You will find outliners that will be in those shoes and disagree and you find those that understand what they do not experience themselves and try to do all they can to discuss and also help. But, you have the bubble- and so many of those people are good people with good intention but they do not understand what they do not experience.

It is sad...
 

brgRC90

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The takeaway is that Jersey City has made an impressive turnaround, too much almost, but as usual some of the same posters have to be negative and attack. Toxic people can't help but spread their negativity to everyone around them.
 
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yesrutgers01

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The takeaway is that Jersey City has made an impressive turnaround, too much almost, but as usual some of the same posters have to be negative and attack. Toxic people can't help but spread their negativity to everyone around them.
JC is a very cool city right now- it, like almost all the cities on the Hudson with easy access to NYC have become havens for the young professionals and it has driven up prices.
Only real complaint about JC is access by Car- what a f-ing nightmare. I have to make that trip tomorrow morning so my wife can babysit our granddaughter.
 

Section124

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The commute to Jersey City from Bergen County by car sucks. That is why I always take the train unless I have a late night dinner. Was always easier from counties south and west (even though that traffic still sucks). To avoid the traffic I would park at the Light Rail station in North Bergen. Love the light rail (except after hours when it only runs what seems like once per hour).
 
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