OT: Jersey City is most expensive city in America

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tico brown

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But whatever the number is obviously it must be high, which makes sense: view of the Manhattan skyline, close proximity to the jobs there and other attractions of the city. It was only a matter of time before the dilapidated, post-industrial wasteland of the New Jersey side of the Hudson River became some of the most valuable real estate in the world. If Philadelphia were more successful Camden would be the same.
They’re building up the area around Rutgers Camden and Cooper Hospital to start.
 

brgRC90

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They’re building up the area around Rutgers Camden and Cooper Hospital to start.
I'm guessing they have a long way to go, although Camden is helped by the fact that much of Philadelphia must be a long way from being gentrified and so is probably no more desirable than Camden. In fact, at least Camden has a waterfront.
 

AreYouNUTS

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I am also curious about the average rent number anyway. Is it being skewed buy a score of 20k+ rents or is that really the median? And I also assume it is the number based on available rentals and not all rents that are being paid in active contracts?
I know my son has a nice 2 BR in a newer building, nice views and amenities walkable to everything and he is under 4k. And as you drive up/down Kennedy etc- most of those multi family have got to be way under that.
2 BR's in "amenity filled buildings" are currently going for 5K+ (you can find some between 4500 and 5K but that's a rate find). I assume your son signed sometime last year and not recently? For example I live in a 2BR/2B with balcony (1100 sq ft) at The Cast Iron Lofts. Huge pool deck, great gym, yada yada. We signed for $3650 in April 2021 for 15 more months. Our renewal rate, when offered 2 months ago, was $4470 (which is what someone new in the unit would have paid; we landed at $4100). My line, TODAY, is now about $5100 for NEW tenants.
 
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tico brown

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I'm guessing they have a long way to go, although Camden is helped by the fact that much of Philadelphia must be a long way from being gentrified and so is probably no more desirable than Camden. In fact, at least Camden has a waterfront.
People from Philly who are being pushed out by gentrification/ higher real estate prices are moving to Camden Waterfront, Collingswood, Haddonfield, and all along the PATCO line same way NYCers are moving to Downtown JC. People in CWood are going ape 💩 on how 3 BRs are now $2000-2500/ month and rising.
 

AntiG

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i would probably guess that Manhattan is more expensive per square foot
 

yesrutgers01

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2 BR's in "amenity filled buildings" are currently going for 5K+ (you can find some between 4500 and 5K but that's a rate find). I assume your son signed sometime last year and not recently? For example I live in a 2BR/2B with balcony (1100 sq ft) at The Cast Iron Lofts. Huge pool deck, great gym, yada yada. We signed for $3650 in April 2021 for 15 more months. Our renewal rate, when offered 2 months ago, was $4470 (which is what someone new in the unit would have paid; we landed at $4100). My line, TODAY, is now about $5100 for NEW tenants.
He has been there 3 years. And that is what I meant. The average new rent is over 5k not the average rent…in total for already signed agreements.
 
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NotInRHouse

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And I'm not sure what raising children has to do with it. That only matters if you have kids and want to raise them in a very white, middle/upper middle class town. Personally, I find suburban towns mind-numbingly boring--Ed Koch was right, they are sterile--and rural areas comatose, nice to visit but terrible to live in.

Plenty of people, especially in NJ also want diversity and that often accompanies excellent public schools in places like Montclair, Edison and West Windsor.

NJ has among the most to offer in terms of every kind of diversity but some posters don't want to know anything besides their cul de sac bubble of ignorance.
 

NotInRHouse

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Theyre rehabbing/ rehabbed old brownstone types on Grand St, north of Bramhall. Believe it or not, the area around the junction (Communipaw/Grand) is being built up slowly but surely.

Maybe Bramhall is the border for now as you are correct about everything South of that street on Ocean, MLK, or Bergen. But there are new buildings coming up on Garfield, Old Bergen Road, and definitely on the Blvd.

That's good. Historically the border was always Communipaw if not Montgomery.
 

yesrutgers01

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Plenty of people, especially in NJ also want diversity and that often accompanies excellent public schools in places like Montclair, Edison and West Windsor.

NJ has among the most to offer in terms of every kind of diversity but some posters don't want to know anything besides their cul de sac bubble of ignorance.
Are those that feel this country has no room for improvement as their world is perfect for them. And anyone that stands up or kneels down to say they should have the right to enjoy that cul de sac bubble, is anti american
 

NotInRHouse

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Are those that feel this country has no room for improvement as their world is perfect for them. And anyone that stands up or kneels down to say they should have the right to enjoy that cul de sac bubble, is anti american

They're for their own ability to speak out, their own ability to live freely and well, but want everyone else to rot and get paid to promote that crap here.

It's obscene considering the legs up they were given and the opportunities RU provides generally.
 

RUBOB72

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Those taking this thread ‘s conversation from the most expensive city in the USA to live , to why people want diversity, to the anti American Bubble cul de sac crowd is pathetic. Noticed the two thumbs up like guys speaks volumes. Leave the political threads out… that’s what many for two years cried about. This was about Real Estate and price points in the NJ market place.FWIW : my diverse neighbors ( many) love cul de sac living.
 

Knight Shift

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It's crumbling down. Don't go. (joking). Saw this on Twitter, and thought of this thread. Jersey City is doing great.

Hope the utility company cut the power first.

 
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mdk01

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Are those that feel this country has no room for improvement as their world is perfect for them. And anyone that stands up or kneels down to say they should have the right to enjoy that cul de sac bubble, is anti american

Not too many cul-de-sac bubbles left in New Jersey. The number of African-Americans has increased a bit, and the number of Asians has soared in most of the best school districts in the state.
 

yesrutgers01

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Not too many cul-de-sac bubbles left in New Jersey. The number of African-Americans has increased a bit, and the number of Asians has soared in most of the best school districts in the state.
lots of those bubbles still left in Bergen Co...and most of the more rural towns in NJ
 

T2Kplus20

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lots of those bubbles still left in Bergen Co...and most of the more rural towns in NJ
Perhaps in Bergen, but not in central NJ (most notably Somerset and Middlesex Counties). The greater Princeton area is pure suburbia and one of the most diverse areas in the entire state.
 

Knight Shift

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This represents the majority of JC. Just another NJ city that is falling apart. LOL!
Oddly, unlike the Willie Nelson song, you are not always on my mind, but you were the first person I thought of that would respond to this post in this thread. May we rename you, Pavlov's Dog?

Every major city has nice and less nice areas.


C0vA.gif
 

T2Kplus20

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Oddly, unlike the Willie Nelson song, you are not always on my mind, but you were the first person I thought of that would respond to this post in this thread. May we rename you, Pavlov's Dog?

Every major city has nice and less nice areas.


C0vA.gif
Be honest.....every major city has mostly less nice areas and a few nice areas (where rich people pushed out all the poor people). Hell, back in the day I used to travel to Chicago for work. My ad agency was HQ'ed there so we would conduct MR with docs and patients. I loved N Michigan Ave. Stayed at the big Marriott all the time and walked over to E Wacker and Mortons. Nicest part of a city that I ever experienced and I travelled to all major cities.

But 98% of Chicago is not N Michigan Ave. LOL!
 

ashokan

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Well, this has been the story of America pretty much forever. Historically, I'm gonna guess that Native Americans would have thought the same thing when Europeans colonized. Must have felt even more foreign to them.

The correct term is "aboriginals"
I'm a native American but I am not an aboriginal

The Comanches (known for brutal tortures) almost made Apaches extinct
"Mohawk" meant "flesheater" because Mohawks were cannibals
American aboriginals were some of the most vicious people who ever existed (as Declaration of Independence states)
The idea aboriginals were born to an allotted geography that all others had to respect is Marxist propaganda intended to discredit modern America
ALL countries are products of conquests and defeats - including wars between aboriginals
America got CA from a Mexico that was inchoate and ungovernable - it practically still is.
Past immigrants didn't come to US and get on WIC, SNAP, SS, emergency Medicaid and all sorts of other benefits America goes into debt to pay.
Current immies are an invasion force run by cartels and corrupt politicians who are ok with risking terror strikes and drugs that will kill 90k in a year.
Past immies respected America and wanted to be Americans
Corrupt politicians have taught them the America they broke into is bad and should be plundered as punishment
That's almost backfiring now and could be inmteresting
 

yesrutgers01

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Not too many cul-de-sac bubbles left in New Jersey. The number of African-Americans has increased a bit, and the number of Asians has soared in most of the best school districts in the state.

Not sure about that. Have you checked the make up of the student bodies at Ridgewood and Tenafly?
We are talking cul de sac bubbles not the entire makeup of a town. Even in Mahwah - I would say in the early 2000's to 2005, Mahwah HS had less than 10% blacks - and usually, black families were referred to as being from a certain section of Mahwah. but now- it is much higher. So- much more diversity in Mahwah but there are plenty of neighborhoods that fit completely into that "bubble". Just because a town becomes more diversified, it doesn't get rid of those bubbles that do not want it in their neighborhood.
 
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RUBOB72

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I can guarantee the ethnic mix of residents on my block qualifies under diverse… both college educated… blue collar… hard working folks. What makes me always laugh is the number of posters here who are RU grads (I assume ) and still telling people where and how they should live. The towns they should be choosing for a diverse universal effect while residing in pluralistic white conclaves . Especially those who boast of having the two homes with one at the Jersey shore . Who cares if you live on a cul de sac?
 

brgRC90

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Plenty of people, especially in NJ also want diversity and that often accompanies excellent public schools in places like Montclair, Edison and West Windsor.

NJ has among the most to offer in terms of every kind of diversity but some posters don't want to know anything besides their cul de sac bubble of ignorance.
For many in my generation cities are bad for a number of reasons, not the least of which is that when we were growing up they were in terrible condition. So most of them fled to the suburbs and never left. They watch the news and they hear about crimes in the nearby big city and hunker down in suburbia. But people who are more intellectually curious and/or don't like the socio-economic monotony of suburbia found their way to cities. Suburbia just doesn't have much to offer them.
 
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tico brown

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For those of you who are interested on how the banks and the government Red Lined one group of people into certain real estate areas while allowing other groups of people to flea to “bubbles.” Good, historical book.

Richard Rothstein

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America​


 
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tom1944

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Not too many cul-de-sac bubbles left in New Jersey. The number of African-Americans has increased a bit, and the number of Asians has soared in most of the best school districts in the state.
The number of Asians in a school district has turned previously lesser districts to soar academically
 

yesrutgers01

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Not too many cul-de-sac bubbles left in New Jersey. The number of African-Americans has increased a bit, and the number of Asians has soared in most of the best school districts in the state.
The number of Asians in a school district has turned previously lesser districts to soar academically
When you refer to a bubble, how big does that bubble have to be- when it is a cup de sac bubble- I take it as protected small areas of towns that absolutely segregate or wish they could. It doesn’t reflect a town or state in a whole. We have a whole lot of these people on this site posting quite often on the CE board.
 
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T2Kplus20

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When you refer to a bubble, how big does that bubble have to be- when it is a cup de sac bubble- I take it as protected small areas of towns that absolutely segregate or wish they could. It doesn’t reflect a town or state in a whole. We have a whole lot of these people on this site posting quite often on the CE board.
Sorry, check the data. Most cities in the tri-state area are horribly segregated. Let’s stick to facts in this thread. Thanks!
 

tom1944

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When you refer to a bubble, how big does that bubble have to be- when it is a cup de sac bubble- I take it as protected small areas of towns that absolutely segregate or wish they could. It doesn’t reflect a town or state in a whole. We have a whole lot of these people on this site posting quite often on the CE board.
This was someone else’s post

I had a problem when I quoted it
 
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mdk01

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When you refer to a bubble, how big does that bubble have to be- when it is a cup de sac bubble- I take it as protected small areas of towns that absolutely segregate or wish they could. It doesn’t reflect a town or state in a whole. We have a whole lot of these people on this site posting quite often on the CE board.

I guess it all hinges on definition. Are there literal cul-de-sacs, 6-12 houses on a dead end street, where that's the case? I'm sure there are. If you are talking about a whole section of a town, I think that's gone.
 

yesrutgers01

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I guess it all hinges on definition. Are there literal cul-de-sacs, 6-12 houses on a dead end street, where that's the case? I'm sure there are. If you are talking about a whole section of a town, I think that's gone.
I'll take a town I know well- if you talk about the Fardale Section of Mahwah- it is there very much. Yes, there is "segregation" but they will outwardly be friendly to outside of their own but there is a very noticeable thin sheet up at all times.
 

fsg2

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Oddly, unlike the Willie Nelson song, you are not always on my mind, but you were the first person I thought of that would respond to this post in this thread. May we rename you, Pavlov's Dog?

Every major city has nice and less nice areas.


C0vA.gif

No way T2K is a Bernese. Those things are gorgeous, properly proportioned and friendly to a fault.
 

Kodiak Bear

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I guess it all hinges on definition. Are there literal cul-de-sacs, 6-12 houses on a dead end street, where that's the case? I'm sure there are. If you are talking about a whole section of a town, I think that's gone.
You haven’t been to Monmouth county I guess.
 

NotInRHouse

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Oddly, unlike the Willie Nelson song, you are not always on my mind, but you were the first person I thought of that would respond to this post in this thread. May we rename you, Pavlov's Dog?

Every major city has nice and less nice areas.


C0vA.gif

This is someone that said it's unsafe outside Stuff Yer Face.

His paid garbage is mostly a joke to everyone.
 
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